TS Queen Alexandra (1902)  
part of the Clyde Turbine Steamers website from paddlesteamers.info - the internet's leading paddle steamer information and photograph database



Queen Alexandra in a view published as a post card by the Clyde River Steamer Club (Gordon Stewart Collection)
Launched on April 8th 1902 by William Denny and Bros. at Dumbarton
Engines : 3 direct drive turbines by Parsons Marine Steam Turbine Co of Newcastle
Dimensions : 270 ft x 32.1 ft
665 Gross Registered Tonnes

Ordered by the Turbine Steamers Ltd to capitalised on the success of TS King Edward
Featured a short observation deck above the promenade deck
Placed on the Campbeltown run, remaining on that station until September 1911
In September 1911 she was severely damaged whilst moored at Greenock
Turbine steamers ordered a new vessel and the Queen was refitted and sold
Crossed the Atlantic to the Pacific coast of Canada for the Canadian Pacific Railway
Renamed Princess Patricia, she served out of Vancouver until scrapped at Victoria in 1937

queen alex pc sent 1911.jpg
Post card of Queen Alexandra post-marked 27th July 1911.     Image kindly supplied by Steve Knight

CANADA


Princess Patricia was the first turbine steamer in the Canadian Pacific Railway fleet and set the course for a successful application of the turbine for ferries sailing on the west coast of Canada. A number of other turbine steamers were delivered to the CP and they remained, as far as practical, loyal to Clyde shipyards for their vessels which were much larger than the Clyde Steamers and more comparable to short-sea vessels such as British cross-channel steamers.
A brief illustrated history of the CP British Columbia coastal steamers can be found on the
Old Time Trains website
Full vessel profiles of the CP's"BCC" service ships can be found on the website of
Gord Simpson

The Canadian Pacific, of course developed an extensive cross-atlantic liner service linking Britain and Europe with the east coast of Canada and operated a number of famous and well loved ships, many of British and Clyde construction. The last of these to survive was the 1956-built Empress of Britain, which was built by Fairfields at Govan, one of three British-built near-sisters, and whilst her life as a liner was short, she became a successful cruise ship. In her final years she was known as the Topaz and ended her days when she was beached at Alang, India on 4th July 2008 for scrapping, at an extremely old age for such a ship.
Empress of Britain, which retained its turbine steam power plant throughout was one of the very last operational steam liners and the very last Clyde-built steam powered liner in service.

Although the CP liner services are out of scope for this website, the following links to relevant articles on the Old Time Trains website will be of interest
Atlantic services
More about the Empresses
Wikipedia article
PJ Sharp's website dedicated to TS Empress of Scotland (1929, Fairfields, Govan) plus "Empresses" Fleet summary


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